Testing for and Treating Waterborne Manganese

Testing, Treating Waterborne Manganese

Manganese is a naturally-occurring groundwater contaminant that is frequently accompanied by its partner, iron.  In its natural form, it is a silver-colored metal that is very hard but very brittle.  While relatively harmless in small amounts, at higher levels its effects include intellectual impairment and reduced IQ in school children (according to a 2010 study).

The secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for manganese set by USEPA standards is 0.5 ppm, or 0.5 milligrams per liter of water.  In concentrations above 0.5 ppm, iron and manganese in water can cause brown, black, or tea-colored staining of fixtures, as well an oily, bittersweet taste.

Testing, Treating Waterborne Manganese Iron and manganese are often found in a dissolved state in well waters.  Water contaminated with these minerals will appear clear when first drawn, but will turn orange/yellow (iron) or brown/black (manganese) when exposed to air, whereupon the minerals are oxidized to a ferric state to form insoluble particles like rust.  This can be observed in appliances like toilet flush tanks, washing machines, and dishwashers.

Testing for manganese is very simple – virtually any well water test kit will include tests for both iron and manganese.  See our selection of well water test kits here; any one of them will give you an accurate reading of your water’s manganese and/or iron levels.

MangOX Iron Filter Testing, Treating Waterborne Manganese

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Once you’ve confirmed the presence of manganese in your water, you’re ready to look into treatment methods.  Take your specific system characteristics into account, including water chemistry and flow rates.  Also decide how the water will be disinfected, and what types of filtration you’ll use.  In some cases, additional treatment such as reverse osmosis or another type of membrane filtration can be used in place of or in conjunction with polymer injection and settling for color removal.

We recommend a chlorinator system (we are fans of the Stenner metering pump and solution tank system) to oxidize iron and manganese in your water, followed by an iron filter to remove the oxidized particulate, and a carbon filter to remove any residual chlorine tastes.

For more on these systems, visit our other blogs and our online store, where you can educate yourself about various water treatment methods and systems, and then parse our available options to find the system that’s right for you.

Testing, Treating Waterborne Manganese

Manganese is a naturally-occurring groundwater contaminant that is frequently accompanied by its partner, iron.  In its natural form, it is a silver-colored metal that is very hard but very brittle.  While relatively harmless in small amounts, at higher levels its effects include intellectual impairment and reduced IQ in school children (according to a 2010 study).

The secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) for manganese set by USEPA standards is 0.5 ppm, or 0.5 milligrams per liter of water.  In concentrations above 0.5 ppm, iron and manganese in water can cause brown, black, or tea-colored staining of fixtures, as well an oily, bittersweet taste.

Testing, Treating Waterborne Manganese Iron and manganese are often found in a dissolved state in well waters.  Water contaminated with these minerals will appear clear when first drawn, but will turn orange/yellow (iron) or brown/black (manganese) when exposed to air, whereupon the minerals are oxidized to a ferric state to form insoluble particles like rust.  This can be observed in appliances like toilet flush tanks, washing machines, and dishwashers.

Testing for manganese is very simple – virtually any well water test kit will include tests for both iron and manganese.  See our selection of well water test kits here; any one of them will give you an accurate reading of your water’s manganese and/or iron levels.

MangOX Iron Filter Testing, Treating Waterborne Manganese

MangOX Iron Filters are very effective at removing oxidized manganese and iron.

Once you’ve confirmed the presence of manganese in your water, you’re ready to look into treatment methods.  Take your specific system characteristics into account, including water chemistry and flow rates.  Also decide how the water will be disinfected, and what types of filtration you’ll use.  In some cases, additional treatment such as reverse osmosis or another type of membrane filtration can be used in place of or in conjunction with polymer injection and settling for color removal.

We recommend a chlorinator system (we are fans of the Stenner metering pump and solution tank system) to oxidize iron and manganese in your water, followed by an iron filter to remove the oxidized particulate, and a carbon filter to remove any residual chlorine tastes.

For more on these systems, visit our other blogs and our online store, where you can educate yourself about various water treatment methods and systems, and then parse our available options to find the system that’s right for you.

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